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Bleeding your power steering - the GM way

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  • Comments: 4
    Views: 13525

Comments




  • Wow! I never thought about using the engines vacuume in place of a vacuume pump, sweet

    Ed H, 5 years ago | Flag
  • Wow! I never thought about using the engines vacuume in place of a vacuume pump, sweet

    Ed H, 5 years ago | Flag
  • Wow! I never thought about using the engines vacuume in place of a vacuume pump, sweet

    Ed H, 5 years ago | Flag
  • An easier way to bleed air out off 06-09 Impala's is to lift the front wheels off the ground and turn the steering wheel from stop to stop about 10 times with the engine off. This is the best way that I've used.

    mainauto, 5 years ago | Flag
  • Love the setup you created for this. Last one I tried I was using a Mityvac and had to sit there pumping like crazy. Didn't work nearly as well. Thanks!
    denneyc, 5 years ago | Flag

Uploaded By: Junius
5 years ago
Description:

One of my fellow employees at the college where I teach automotive had a power steering noise on her '08 Impala (52,000 miles on the clock). She spoke to a dealership mechanic she knew, and all he could remember off the top of his head was a simple recall that had nothing to do with a power steering noise. 

She then visited a local filling station/service center (yes, we still have some of those in small south Alabama towns) and he wanted to replace the power steering pump.  Before having that work done, she decided to ask me about it and I did some research to find this procedure published by GM in TSB 08-02-32-004B. 

While I was somewhat skeptical of this process, it wouldn't cost a lot of time or money to make it happen, but I substituted a nice new rubber oil filler cap (you know, the ones that were used on older small block Chevies?) for the rubber cork GM recommended. These are available at your local parts store. A barbed brass or plastic fitting, some clear hose, a hole drilled through the rubber cap, and I had a special tool.  The power steering was very noisy during the process, but after I was finished, the noise was gone!  How the power steering system on these units gets airbound without having been emptied of fluid is a mystery, at least to me - cavitation borne of high heat and intense hydraulic action? Maybe.  One way or another, the noise was real, this process fixed it, and she didn't need a pump.

I did this demonstration on a 2001 Pontiac Montana with a noisy power steering system to make the video.

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