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  • Customers who want to bring their own parts.

    Anyone have any comical  ( yet  Effective ) signage to deal with illustrating we only wish to use our parts not parts we don't profit from?

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    • By ksnider
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    • 3 years ago
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  • customers parts

    Two things I do when installing customers parts.My labor rate goes from $80.hr to 90 or 100.hr also no warrranty on the parts or the labor if the part fails or dont correct the problem.I have no problem telling custmers my overhead and the hours I work.In my opinion they should feel shame for being so cheap!

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    • By ambler
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  • Re: Customers who want to bring their own parts.

    I just don't warranty the work.  Guys who bring their own parts are just looking for the cheapest guy that moment.  So, if I have a bay open I take the job, pocket the cash, and never see the deadbeat ever again.

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    • By Car_Clinic
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    • 3 years ago
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  • customer supplied parts

    Increasing the labor rate a few bucks doesn't even come close to the profits lost or needed. Yes, you could double the labor, which may be enough, but that only solves half of the problem with customer supplied parts. YOU OWN THE PART. Whether you like it or not, and whether you document it or not. YOU OWN THE PART for your implied warranty. You do not want to try and defend it in a court of law. You are the professional, you took the money to install it. YOU OWN THE PART. A savvy consumer has this wonderful tool today, the internet, and a motivated idiot will do the research. If that part failed, causing harm or damage, you may be sued. You have too much to lose, it's not worth it.

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    • By bstasch
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  • CUSTOMER SUPPLIED PARTS

    The real cute one is when the extended warranty company sends you an injection pump to put in this guy's Cummins Dodge, then want you to drain, pack, label, and ship the core back to them.  Riiiiiiggggghhhtttt.  I'll get right on that turkey.

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    • By Josh_is_parts
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  • customer supplied parts

    I beg to differ on the customer supplied parts issue.  Some guys who bring in parts, bring in the high-dollar stuff that it would make no sense for our shop to stock.  These guys know what they want; they've done their homework on quality and function.  I understand their position, and explain to them that I can't warranty the part (although typically the part is warrranted by the manufacturer.)  I will stand behind my installation every inch of the way, and they respect my position and work.

    Now, having said that, the cheapskates who bring in suspect parts....I explain why their part is junk and what additional parts will fail when the one they brought me does.  I tell them I would feel bad charging them twice; once when I install it, and once when I have to replace it (plus the additional parts it will damage.)  I offer them suggestions on alternate parts (including those I don't sell) and what the difference is.  If the part is inferior to what I sell, I will not install it.  Hey; my shop, my rules.

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    • By jeffzx9
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    • 3 years ago
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  • Re: Customers who want to bring their own parts.

    Ask the customer if they would go to a restuarant with their own steak and ask to have it cooked for them.

    Edited by wcardoc, 3 years ago

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    • By wcardoc
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  • Customer supplied parts.

    This approach works very well for my shop. I explain to the customer that we DO NOT install parts that customers supply. PERIOD.  I also explain the reasons why. First of all, my shop, just like all others depend on parts profits to help pay the overhead associated with running a high quality repair shop. Second, we cannot warranty the parts they supply. They always say thats ok, but I explain,   it has happened before that a part will fail, and the customer claims we installed the part improperly. Just a no win situation. Then I let them know for just and few dollars more, I can provide them with a very high quality part, install it, and stand behind the parts and labor. About 8 out of 10 times, the customer appreciates the honesty and becomes a customer, some into long time customers!! If not, we don't need them for customers.

    Edited by Precision1, 3 years ago

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    • By Precision1
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  • re: customers who want to bring their own parts

    Bstasch got it right. We're the professionals who have to provide a warranty on the parts that we install and you are losing 30-50% of your revenue depending on how you price your parts. Plus, you are taking away a big chunk of the value that you offer your clients because you are allowing them to part of your job. It will change their perception of the kind of shop you are (not in a good way).   Clients who want you to work for them will not ask you to install their parts and usually aren't going to haggle with you over price.

  • No exceptions!

    I can think of many times when I bent my own rule and installed a customer-supplied part, even after I explained the extra charges they would incur and that there would be no warranty.  In several of those instances, parts have failed (as was expected), but the customer seems to forget the conversation we had, and what was documented on the Repair Order.  They still want to blame us!

    In one instance, I installed a reman clutch for a customer who begged and pleaded and swore up and down that he understood that there would be no warranty on the parts he brought in.  We installed the clutch, but the pressure plate had problems right out of the gate.  When I called and explained this to him, he was livid.  He wanted me to warranty the repair and replace the clutch at my expense.  The clutch he had purchased came from an online store with no return policy and no warrantly.  Yes, we got rid of the customer, but it was not without a lot of yelling and screaming on his part.  I have not installed a customer-supplied part since then (3 years ago).

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    • By loosenutjust
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    • 3 years ago
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  • Customers who want to bring their own parts.

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    • By richjarv
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    • 3 years ago
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  • Customers who want to bring their own parts.

    Almost with out fail everytime someone asks to make an exception, either supplying their own parts, a break on labor, or making installment payments, their request is just the beginning of a bad ending.  The worst part is that there must be some sort of network out there that you get your shop name posted on and you will invite a steady flow of people needing repairs they can't afford because they are on a "FIXED INCOME".  I have always been on a "FIXED INCOME" and it's always been FIXED TOO LOW!  As Mr. Stasch says you accept the part and you become responsible for the warranty.  It's been tested in court and I don't have time for court.

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    • By richjarv
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  • Customers who want to bring their own parts.

    i let them  if thay ok with my rule

    i will tell them cash up front for the repair,

     no warranty at all

    also 30% mark up on hies parts  if i see the recite if thay show  no recite is 50 bucks mark up  on the parts.

     

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    • By eurotech
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    • 3 years ago
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  • Customers who want to bring in there own parts

    Get back to basics. The rule I try to follow with all customers is before we decide to make a repair to any car we need to know that it meets three criteria, it needs to be good for the car, good for the customer, and good for the shop. Any time you allow a customer to bring there own part you loose the needed profit on that job so it cannot be good for the shop.

    Also the type of customer your cultivating with this practice in general shouldn't be the type of customer you want in your shop.

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    • By brucenation
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  • Customer supplied parts.

    I handle customer supplied parts by pointing out that their car was designed to perform a specific way.  The OEM quality parts were designed to maintain that level of performance.   Anything less will cause the car to become substandard in some way.   I then point out the form I have made up stating the problems that may arise from installing substandard parts, I point to the paragraph stating that any parts supplied by the customer will not be covered under ANY warranty other than basic installation, and if the part fails or does not perform as expected the customer will have to pay the labor again to replace it.  I then show them that I only offer two options for replacing the failed substandard part.   I will put the old part back on, at regular labor rates, or I will install a part of MY choosing, for standard price and labor rate.   I then ask them if they want to sign the waver or have me repair the car properly.

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    • By BradG
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    • 3 years ago
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  • customer supplied parts

    i recently had an issue on this same subject in my shop. Trying to save this young mother some money. Good intentions with a bad outcome. AC compressor replacement on a 92 lexus es300. $144 labor for install plus a $79.95 system recharge. The 1st new compressor was bad from the beginning. So we ended up reinstalling another one for her. After giving the parts house a hard time on the bad one, they reluctantly replaced the other. after the install was done, her car started over heating when she would drive it, nothing to do with the install, separate issue. It didn't happen though until after we did the install, so it must have been something we must have done according to her. We ended up selling her a thermostat at a very cutrate price to make her happy. Then after she picked up her car, she came back in saying her ignition key was broken. this is one of those with the security system built in it. Well $400 later for the new key plus the other issues she was finally happy. I made it a policy at this point to never install another customer part again. I do people like this use their ignorance on the subject to benefit them. i recommend to stay away from customer bought parts.

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    • By autoguitar
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    • 3 years ago
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  • Customer parts

    Thanks for the replies everyone. Although they weren't quite what I was asking for in my original post. We deal with customer supplied parts by mostly saying NO! Only the most basic parts are considered. And then, only when in conjunction with other repairs completed at the same time. My post asked for comical or humorus signs to post in the main waiting area to get a laugh and at the same time discourage customers from asking. We like to keep it light hearted and subliminal. Just like we all use signs to sell, they can also be used to influence your customers actions.

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    • By ksnider
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    • 3 years ago
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  • Notice To All:

    If you bring your own parts please also supply the following:

    Your own tools.  We'd like to use yours.

    Your generator, we'd like to use your electric.

    A shirt, pants, and size 11 steel toe boots.

    A various supply of chemicals, cleaners, and sealants.

    Bring a list any torque specs you'd like us to use.

    Include a broom, hand cleaner, and a trash bag to take

     your mess home with you.

    Also, please be prepared to wait until the entire repair is finished

     in case the parts you brought with you are wrong, and you can deal with

     trying to get the right ones.

    A notary public to sign a realease form to alleviate the burden of liability

     for installing your parts.

    We may also need some additional fees to cover enviromental, workers' compensation,

     and B&O taxes that may be incurred.

    A gallon of luke warm water and several shop towels. Our

     hands are sensitive, and we don't like cold water.

    Lunch.  We like pizza.

    Or, you could just let us take care of the whole darned thing.

  • I'll just ask "all they can say is no"

    Dear Mr. Customer we are sorry to inform you due to our liability department we cannot install customer supplied parts for your auto repair, however we would gladly install any auto accessory we have experience in installing that has a manufacture warranty against defects at your own risk.

    Because we value you as a customer we are happy to refer you to shops in the area that do practice installing customer supplied parts that are not aware that they have a liability department for your convenience. They are:

    Shade Tree Auto Repairs (555) 555-1212 ask for Skeeter

    My Busted Knuckles Quick Oil Change (555) 444-1212 ask for Bubba

    No More Headaches Service Center (555) 333-1212 ask for Mr. Fuentes

    OMG So Cheap Auto Repair (555) 222-1212 ask for Sum Yung Guy

    The Customer Is Always Right Auto Shop (555) 111-1212 ask for Roxy

     

     

    Edited by catman5oh, 3 years ago

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    • By catman5oh
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    • 3 years ago
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  • Customer supplied parts: Just say no!!!

    In this it is important to note that only written warranties are covered by Magnuson-Moss. Though very important, express warranties offer unfortunate opportunities to get ourselves in trouble. A warranty is our promise, as a seller, to stand behind our products and sold services. It is our commitment to correct problems that occur on products we sell and sold services we provide. Federal law and most state laws recognize two kinds of warranties, implied and express. Implied warranties are tied to state law and are an unspoken, unwritten promise between our customer and us as a seller. They are based on the common law principle of "fair value for money spent." Further, there are two types of implied warranties. They are the implied warranty of merchantability and the implied warranty of fitness for a particular purpose. A common example is installing used parts and customer-supplied parts. I can think of any number of times where a customer pleaded and begged with me to install a used junkyard part or a part that they supplied. I remember reluctantly agreeing, warning the customer that the part would have no warranty and going to the trouble of writing in huge letters all over the receipt that there was no warranty. State courts have ruled again and again that an automotive repair shop is perceived as expert in its field and that the very instant we agree to install a used or customer supplied part, we are agreeing to accept any liability associated with its failure. I know that in my home state of Maryland and many other states, there also is an issue of parts warranties not being transferrable. In Maryland, any installed part has to be given a minimum 4,000-mile/90-day warranty, and any repair facility would be on its own if a customer supplied part fails. Those implied warranties are very serious business, with all of the risk and liability that comes with them, including such little gems as responsibility for property damage or bodily injury. Install a customer supplied part at your own risk.

    Edited by brimarc, 2 years ago

  • customer supplied parts

    Twenty years ago I hired a builder for my new house. When the garage door was to be installed, I asked the builder how much his garage door guy would charge to install the door opener I had just bought from Sears. His reply is the best I've ever heard and I use it to this day. He said, "Would you bring your own eggs and bacon to a high class restaurant and ask them to cook it for you and charge you only for labor?" Then he just shut up and stared at me. I was so embarrassed, I've never asked anyone to supply labor-only since then. It really drove home the point.

    Edited by RickMN, 2 years ago

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    • By RickMN
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    • 2 years ago
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